On March 25, 2020, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) published new relief that supersedes its March 13, 2020 order for investment advisers filing and delivery obligations of Form ADV and Form PF. We have updated our original post to reflect the relief provided in the SEC’s new March 25 order. This new order extends the time of the relief to June 30, 2020, and eliminates the requirement for the adviser to provide the SEC and clients with a description of the reasons why the adviser is relying on the order and an estimated date by which the required filing will occur.

On March 30, 2020, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) Division of Trading and Markets (“Division”) issued a No-Action Letter relating to market practices regarding bank sweep programs requested by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association. Specifically, the No-Action Letter provides that the Division will not recommend enforcement action for non-compliance with broker-dealer net capital requirements with respect to broker-dealers that treat certain receivables resulting from bank sweep programs as “allowable assets” for purposes of the net capital requirements.

This post explains the No-Action Letter and related Exchange Act requirements. Continue Reading SEC Staff Provide No-Action Relief Relating to Broker-Dealer Net Capital Requirements

On March 26, 2020, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), announced two agency actions providing additional relief to market participants in response to the impacts of COVID-19 on the markets. First, the SEC adopted an interim final rule providing relief related to (a) market participants needing to gain access to make filings on the EDGAR system and (b) certain company filing obligations under Regulation A and Regulation Crowdfunding. Second, the SEC published a temporary conditional exemptive order providing relief from certain filing requirements for municipal advisors.

This blog post summarizes the SEC relief and conditions to the relief. Continue Reading SEC Provides Additional Regulatory Relief in Wake of COVID-19

In our previous post, we reviewed how the financial markets’ reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic requires mutual funds to review, and possibly reclassify, the liquidity of their investments. As liquidity and valuation are often two sides of the same coin, factors that may lead to reclassifying a security’s liquidity may also raise questions concerning how to value the security for purposes of calculating a mutual fund’s net asset value (“NAV”). This post discusses when this may be the case. Continue Reading Navigating Mutual Funds in Rough Markets—Valuation

During a recent webinar, Steve explained that the market and trading conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic might be “reasonably expected to materially affect one or more of [a mutual fund’s] investments’ classifications” for purposes of the fund’s liquidity risk management program (its “LRM Program”). In this circumstance, Rule 22e-4 under the Investment Company Act of 1940 requires more frequent review of these classifications. This post describes how a rough market may require a mutual fund (other than a money market fund or in-kind exchange traded fund) to reclassify an investment’s liquidity classification. Continue Reading Navigating Mutual Funds in Rough Markets—Liquidity

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the financial markets have experienced significant volatility. During the course of this volatility, exchanges have halted trading multiple times after declines in trading trigged circuit breakers. In addition, trading floors are transitioning to electronic trading in efforts to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 on physical trading floors. With the recent turmoil, this post provides a high-level summary of the various types of circuit breakers and what can be expected. Continue Reading Understanding Circuit Breakers, Our New Reality, in the Time of COVID-19

Another day, another expansion of the Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (the “Facility”) from the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston (“FRBB”). As before, I’ve updated my original post to conform to the current program. There is now a website with a full set of documents, so I’ve updated the link to that website. The biggest change is the inclusion of certificates of deposit and variable rate demand obligations as Eligible Collateral. FRBB has also provided FAQs for the Facility.

Yesterday I posted a summary of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility (the “Facility”). Today it expanded the Facility to include tax exempt money market funds and municipal securities. Rather than write a separate post, I updated my original post so all the information is in one place and up to date. The blog editor does not have search functions, so forgive me if I haven’t removed every reference to “Prime” or inserted “Muni” in every appropriate spot.

A favorite client has also furnished me with a companion no-action letter obtained by the Investment Company Institute (“ICI”). I cannot link to the letter because I have not found it on either the SEC’s or ICI’s website. The letter is summarized below. Continue Reading Update on Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility

The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston (“FRBB”) has established a new Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility. (I’m not sure what acronym to use here; “mmm … Fund Liquidity” would work. Let’s just call it the “Facility.”) The Facility opened on March 23, 2020. This post summarizes the significant terms of the Facility and suggests an idea for fund boards to consider. Continue Reading Information on the Prime and Tax Exempt Money Market Fund Liquidity Facility (Updated 3/23)